Meet Dr. Richard Jackson

Q: What made you interested in a career in stroke?

A: My father was a general neurologist who believed that a generalist could treat anyone with the right resources and knowledge. He even starting the tPA program in my hometown. I, too, became a generalist, but I realized after three years that with the rapidly changing treatments and a large need in most communities, my current level of knowledge would not be enough in the near future. 

Q: What has been your career path into this field?

A: I started out as a generalist and created programs in Botox and confusion locally, but starting a primary stroke center showed me that to treat people on that size scale, specialized training would be required. The need, coupled with a previous interest in vascular neurology and neuroimaging, helped shape the decision to return to fellowship.

Q: Who is your stroke mentor or stroke hero?

A: Drs. Daniel Rosenbaum, Steven Levine, Alison Baird, Susan Law, Adrien Marchidann, and Nikolaos Papamitszakis as a team helped shape me both as a professional and as a person in my training and continue do so to this day. I feel very fortunate that such an accomplished group would take the time to foster my education and career, each one in different ways.

Q: What is a piece of advice you would give to a trainee?

A: If you don’t know the answer before the MRI, you likely won’t know afterwards either.

Q: What is your favorite hobby or way of de-stressing?

A: Spending time with my family. It reminds me both of what’s most important to my own life and also why patients seek out medical help.

Q: What is your favorite place to travel to?

A: There is a beach on a local lake where my wife and I watch the sunset in the summer and the kids can play in the sand.